Enter the WHO Health For All Film Festival

Posted Tuesday 21 Jan 2020

Filmmakers, here's an opportunity to get your film in front of an international audience. In May 2020, during the 73rd World Health Assembly in Geneva, Switzerland, WHO will host the first ever Health for All Film Festival. The Festival aims to recruit a new generation of film and video innovators to champion and promote global health issues. Submissions are open for both seasoned film professionals and young, aspiring filmmakers. Submit one video for one of the categories outlined below by January 30, 2020 (final submission date), and just a note, only films completed between 1 January 2017 and 30 January 2020 are eligible for this festival.

The categories are:
Video reports (3-8 minutes long) Video reports showing human-interest stories and testimonies about health from individuals, communities, and/or healthcare workers navigating a local or global health challenge, championing solutions, or driving change.

Animations (1-5 minutes long) Animation videos that include either testimonials and/or challenges and solutions to achieving health and well-being for all, or to educate about a health issue.

Videos about nurses and midwives (3-8 minutes long). Any audiovisual style will be accepted for submissions on this special theme during the International Year of the Nurse and the Midwife, celebrated in 2020.

 

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Phillips' film picks up multiple gongs

Phillips' film picks up multiple gongs

Posted Tuesday 21 Jan 2020

A big congratulations to April Phillips (pictured) and the team who worked on The Last Man On Earth, a finalist at the Flickers Rhode Island International Film Festival. The film has also just picked up six awards at the Independent Shorts Awards, including gold in the Best Women Short and Best Supporting Actor categories, and Silver in the Best director (Female) and Best Sci-Fi categories. We especially loved the acknowledgement of Best Supporting Actor for Duncan Armstrong (below) an actor and performer shattering myths about the capabilities of people with Down Syndrome. Set in a post apocalyptic world, The Last Man On Earth has themes about the value of people with disabilities and society's negative stereotypes towards them.